Daily Archives

October 10, 2012

Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine Could Prevent Thousands of Cancers and Genital Warts, Especially for Women and Gay Men

By | LGBT Health | No Comments
Analysis from The Fenway Institute finds U.S. lags other countries–most U.S. doctors don’t prescribe HPV vaccine; only one-third of eligible females have been vaccinated Human papilloma virus (HPV)—contracted by six million Americans each year, mostly through sexual contact—is preventable through a vaccine now recommended for all females and males age 11 to 26. However, vaccination rates remain low in the U.S., in part because only one-third of doctors prescribe the vaccine to eligible patients, according to an analysis by The Fenway Institute released today.  HPV infection can lead to genital warts and certain types of cancer. “HPV vaccine could prevent 
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National Coming Out Day Artwork by Keith Haring

National Coming Out Day: Come Out for Your Health

By | LGBT Health, Youth | No Comments
October 11 is National Coming Out Day, celebrating those who publicly identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT), and allies. Coming Out Day is an opportunity to acknowledge the courage it can take to live openly as LGBT and raise awareness about the issues that still face our community. Whether or not to come out is a deeply personal decision—and one that might not be right for everyone. For those who decide coming out is right for them, the experience can be extremely powerful and rewarding. People who come out can experience a boost in their well-being—experiencing less anger, less 
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Analysis from The Fenway Institute finds U.S. lags other countries—most U.S. doctors don’t prescribe HPV vaccine; only one-third of eligible females have been vaccinated

HPV Vaccine Could Prevent Thousands of Cancers and Genital Warts, Especially for Women and Gay Men

By | Health Policy, LGBT Health, Research, The Fenway Institute | One Comment
Human papilloma virus (HPV)—contracted by six million Americans each year, mostly through sexual contact—is preventable through a vaccine now recommended for all females and males age 11 to 26. However, vaccination rates remain low in the U.S., in part because only one-third of doctors prescribe the vaccine to eligible patients, according to an analysis by The Fenway Institute released today. HPV infection can lead to genital warts and certain types of cancer. “HPV vaccine could prevent thousands of cases of cervical cancer, anal cancer, oropharyngeal and other cancers each year,” said Kenneth Mayer, MD, Medical Research Director and Co-Chair of 
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