Tag

HIV

Fenway is extremely proud of the many talented and diverse people who make our work and mission possible. In this series, we are thrilled to highlight the newest providers who have joined the team to help us in delivering high-quality care to the LGBT community and our surrounding neighborhood.

New Provider Spotlight: Hubert Roberts III, Primary Care Physician

By | Fenway Health Newsroom, Fenway News, LGBT Health | No Comments
Hubert Roberts, III, Primary Care Physician Joined Fenway in November, 2016 Education: Bachelor’s in Biology from Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Doctor of Medicine from Boston University School of Medicine. Residency: General Internal Medicine, Primary Track at Rhode Island Hospital/Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. What inspired you to become a Primary Care Physician? I know it sounds cliche, but I wanted to help people. Primary care in particular gives me a unique opportunity to help people by treating a very wide range of medical problems. In primary care, there are also opportunities to help prevent a wide range of 
Read More
CDC logo

CDC Awards Fenway Health, AIDS Action, Multicultural AIDS Coalition $3.78m for ‘Getting To Zero’ HIV Prevention Partnership

By | Fenway Health Newsroom, Fenway News, HIV/AIDS | One Comment
The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have awarded Fenway Health, AIDS Action Committee of Massachusetts, and the Multicultural AIDS Coalition $3.78 million for a five-year HIV prevention partnership that will focus on gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women, the  groups at highest risk of HIV infection in the US.  Dubbed ‘Getting to Zero,’ the initiative will target hard-to-reach, high risk members of these communities and connect them to HIV counseling and testing, health care, and prevention services. “Massachusetts is one of the few places in the country where HIV 
Read More
For AIDS Walk Boston participant Kelly Rush (third from the left), every walk is a journey of self-acceptance.

Why I Walk: Kelly Rush

By | AIDS Action Committee, AIDS Walk & 5K Run Boston, Fenway Health Newsroom, HIV/AIDS | No Comments
At 6.2 miles, the AIDS Walk Boston route is not very long compared to other fundraising walks. But for Kelly Rush, it represents a long journey to self-acceptance. Since he first started walking in 2011, Rush and his team, now called Divas and Devils, have raised more than $21,000 for AIDS Action Committee, making them one of AIDS Walk Boston’s most prolific fundraising groups. It’s a long way from where he was 15 years ago—or even six years ago. On July 11, 2001 Rush was taken by ambulance to Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital with a high fever and severe dehydration. 
Read More
Fenway's Project BUILD will examine the body image concerns of HIV-positive MSM.

Project BUILD Explores Body Image Concerns Of HIV-Positive Men

By | Fenway Health Newsroom, HIV/AIDS, HIV/AIDS, LGBT Health, The Fenway Institute | No Comments
The Fenway Institute has announced Project BUILD, a new research study that will examine how body image and appearance concerns affect the self-care of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). The object of this six month research study is to discover how body image concerns and HIV self-care behavior come together and interact. Researchers will primarily focus on self-care behavior in study participants, such as HIV medication adherence and sexual health practices. Project BUILD will look at the experiences of HIV-positive MSM who are struggling with appearance concerns. Study participants must be between the ages of 18 and 
Read More
Jim McDonnel has been walking in AIDS Walk Boston since its early years.

Why I Walk: Jim McDonnel

By | AIDS Action Committee, AIDS Walk & 5K Run Boston, Fenway Health Newsroom, HIV/AIDS | No Comments
When Jim McDonnel took his first steps for AIDS Walk Boston, HIV/AIDS was greatly misunderstood and widely stigmatized. Mentions of AIDS-related deaths flooded LGBT newspapers. Entire communities were falling ill. Despite the urgency felt by those affected and their loved ones, there was still precious little federal money going towards AIDS treatment and research. “In those days, there was so much education needed,” Jim said. “People were scared to death, but they really had no idea what AIDS was. The biggest hurdle was making people understand that it wasn’t just a disease for gay people.” After hearing about the work 
Read More